2.08.2011

FYM REWIND: ENTER THE VOID

(FYM REWIND: is a cinematic feature series, showcasing the best of Netflix InstantQue movies. Recently our LA Senior Writer: Will Sellers, and Seattle Art Director: Jesse Codling were both turned on to a movie called Enter The Void, we both enjoyed this movie so much, that this film has inspired the first joint-review of any FYM feature story. All shots from the film below, once clicked on, can be expanded for greater detail.) 

Exploring the darkest realms of human consciousness and existence, Enter The Void leaves all boundaries shattered in the most ambitious visually analeptic masterpiece cinema has ever championed. Buenos Aries- born, French Filmmaker Gaspar Noe´ draws from a formidable counsel of stimulus- Lynch, Kubrick, Akerlund, Scott (Blade Runner) to deliver the most advanced description of humanity, offering one's spirit an unflappably abrupt intimacy with the main player.

Enter The Void is like looking into the Brahman for three hours, followed by a cold shower of amorous visual taboos you cannot help but relate with. Even during the most subtle moments, the mind-beinding fluidity of Enter The Void's camera prowess tantalizes the eye with organic dreamlike wizardry. It's a film that sabotages the mind into an out of body lucid experience living through the eyes of Oscar, our doomed archetype, and his unbounded affection for his counter part Linda (his sister).


This movie is a must see. A few words of advice, in preparation before viewing, your mind should be on a higher state of consciousness. Be willing to experience nearly three hours of peerless visual supplement, dispatching enigmatic specters, blunting your vision of reality.

-j. codling

See Below: The greatest, most original opening title sequence in film!


How often do you watch or even just hear about a movie that is such an utterly original work of art AND concurrently an adaptation? Gaspar Noé's Enter the Void is not an adaptation in the traditional sense. It is an adaption of a concept. More specifically, it is an adaptation of the concept of The Tibetan Book of the Dead, the ancient text written as a guide for the soul passing through the afterlife on its way to reincarnation.


Enter the Void is a psychedelic journey of the self. Calling it a look at what "flashes before your own eyes" in the face of death is a premature understatement, as much of the film's journey takes place after death, with central character Oscar's ghostly self-reflection of his personal history of his own life: from death to birth and back again. The movie destroys any preexisting concept of narration. It jumps from various point to various point in Oscar's life from his perspective, sometimes first-person, sometimes second-person, often with the camera directly behind his head like some sort of psychedelic first-person shooter video game.

Calling its seemingly random story structure a "stream of consciousness" is also an understatement. Enter the Void is consciousness. Noé penetrates the very notion of "consciousness" and films from within, giving the viewer a one-of-a-kind psychic experience inside the mind of someone who can be just like you or me.


First time actors Nathaniel Brown and Cyril Roy more than hold their own as main character Oscar and his closest friend in Tokyo Alex, respectively. But the standout here is Boardwalk Empire's Paz de la Huerta, who gives a heartbreaking and fearless performance as Oscar's buoyant sister Linda. Noé more than proves himself as a visionary and an extremely inventive director who deserves to be in the spotlight for his next project and beyond.

-w. sellers


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